FALL SCHEDULE 2018

WE THE ANIMALS

USA, 2018; 94 min. R. Direction: Jeremiah Zagar; script: Daniel Kitrosser, Jeremiah Zagar.

Paps, who is Puerto Rican, and his Anglo wife Ma intertwine like young, inseparable, but stinging vines in their working-class marriage. Meanwhile their rambunctious kids, Manny, Joel and Jonah are largely left to raise themselves and sweat out their turbulent adolescence on their own. We witness the episodes of that coming-of-age, in a small fallen factory town in upstate New York, through the eyes of Jonah, the youngest and most sensitive of the brothers, who increasingly escapes the emotional explosions around him by creating intricate and fantastic drawings in a private sketchbook.

Reviews

“A film that feels like something conjured out of memory and magic, a poetic, often ecstatic recreation of childhood that captures its ungovernable pleasures as vividly as its most threatening terrors” – Washington Post.

We The Animals isn’t the sort of film that much concerns itself with the more usual conventions of filmmaking, such as the passage of time or even plot itself. It’s more of a mood, punctuated by clear whacks of emotional trauma. It’s a little bit like watching a poem”- Austin Chronicle.

“Has an elemental quality that’s hugely endearing, using air and water and the deep, damp earth to fashion a dreamworld where big changes occur in small, sometimes symbolic ways”- NY Times.

Days/Times

Wednesday October 3 – 7:30PM;
Saturday October 6 – 7:30PM;
Sunday October 7 – 1, 2:55PM. NOTE: No show Tuesday October 2.

Tickets

$6.00 adults, $4.00 seniors, $3.00 Clark students, faculty and staff (with ID)

 

THE CAKEMAKER

Israel/Germany 2018; 113 min. NR. English and subtitles. Direction and screenplay: Ofir Raul Graizer

Quiet young Berlin baker Thomas (Tim Kalkhof) falls into an affair with Jerusalem businessman Oren (Roy Miller) during Oren’s monthly business trips to Germany. Then, after a baffling hiatus, Thomas learns the worst – Oren was killed in a car accident in Jerusalem. Emotionally bereft, he closes his shop and travels to Israel, where he makes the acquaintance of Oren’s widow Anat (Sarah Adler). Anat runs a struggling coffee shop, but business picks way up when she hires Thomas to bake. The secret they share is his non-kosher status. The secret he withholds from her is the past he shared with her husband….

Reviews

“Tracing with exemplary sensitivity the unlikely bond formed between a gay German baker and the Jerusalem-based widow of the man they both loved, Graizer’s film works a complex range of social and religious tensions into its heartsore narrative, without ever feeling sanctimonious or button-pushing” – Variety.

“Graizer takes his time and never feels the need to spell everything out, and The Cakemaker is a testament to what filmmakers can achieve when they trust the audience”- SF Chronicle.

“The debut feature of 37-year-old writer-director Ofir Raul Graizer, this provocative, unexpected and finally very moving work is as unusual a love story as you are likely to find…. it joins an exploration of sexual fluidity and the nature of love and relationships with a strong plot that keeps you involved and guessing until the very end…. told with such low-key, unforced delicacy and tact that it becomes plausible and convincing right in front of our eyes.”- LA Times.

WINNER OF 6 ISRAELI FILM ACADEMY AWARDS, INCLUDING BEST PICTURE, BEST DIRECTOR, BEST ACTRESS AND BEST SCREENPLAY.

Days/Times

Tuesday October 9 – 7:30PM;
Wednesday October 10 – 7:30PM;
Friday October 12 – 7:30PM.
Sunday October 14 – 1, 3:15PM. NOTE: No show Saturday 10/13. Friday 10/12 substitutes.

Tickets

$6.00 adults, $4.00 seniors, $3.00 Clark students, faculty and staff (with ID)

 

BISBEE ’17

USA 2018; 112 min. NR. Direction: Robert Greene.

In 1917 the United States went to war with Kaiser Wilhelm’s Germany. Bisbee, Arizona was the copper-mining capital of the world. The copper miners of Bisbee, mostly Mexican and Eastern European immigrants, chafed under dangerous working conditions, low wages, and discrimination. Radicalized by the International Workers of the World, they struck the mines. The powers that be – the county sheriff and the mining company – retaliated with the Bisbee Deportation: rounding up some 1200 strikers and others at gunpoint and exiling them to the New Mexican desert, with warnings never to return on penalty of death. In 2017, Bisbee decided to reenact this notorious event of local history, with townspeople (some of them descendants of the original participants) playing both the miners and the deputized mob that evicted them. The consequences were compelling, unpredictable and deeply resonant of the American condition both past and present.

Reviews

“A searing work of American folk art”Slant Magazine.

Collapses past and present into one another, and in doing so achieves a singularly strange and unsettling vision of apparently intractable American hatreds The Film Stage.

“Straddles past and present in ways that would be plenty unsettling even without any knowledge of recent headlines” – The AV Club.

Sundance Film Festival, Grand Jury Prize nominee, Best Documentary.

Days/Times

Tuesday October 16 – 7:30PM;
Wednesday October 17 – 7:30PM;
Friday October 19 – 7:30PM.
Sunday October 21 – 1, 3:15PM.  NOTE: No show Saturday 10/20. Friday 10/19 substitutes.

Tickets

$6.00 adults, $4.00 seniors, $3.00 Clark students, faculty and staff (with ID)

TUESDAY OCTOBER 23- ?………We’ll see what happens!

 

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